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I was just asked a question, "What is the point of the Occupy Movement?" Very valid question. And the answer is quite simple: We, the people of the world, realize that the way in which we are living is no longer sustainable. We seek to make changes but those who control nearly everything are too few and only make changes that suit themselves. In fact the powerful few are often ruthless, greedy and wildly irresponsible with our resources and with the power we have given them. We seek to to take our power back - nonviolently. Under that umbrella are a whole host of concerns, ranging from the influence of money in politics, unjust wars, rigged banking systems, ecological concerns, just to name a few. This is a rapidly growing worldwide movement but it is also a personal movement. That is why the question was asked, "What is your demand?" What we are engaged in is a shift in the power structure and we are prepared for the responsibility both collectively and personally that will come with that. We seek a better world.


OCCUPY TOGETHER - OCCUPY WITHIN.
Peace.

 

 

www.EricAllenBell.org

 


Views: 5316

Comment by Steve Osborne on November 12, 2011 at 11:23am

This is the best description of the purpose of our movement. It comes down to sustainable habits, honest legislation, and durable prosperity. We already are a force. In October alone, we moved $4.5 billion out of banks and into credit unions, meaning more credit for local markets.

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